November 2014
M T W T F S S
« Feb    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930

Skin Cancer May Depend Greatly on Genes

While it is true that the likelihood of getting skin cancer, and we’re talking the most deadly kind, melanoma here, was mostly quantified by correlating it with people who were fair skinned and were exposed to too many UV rays in their lifetimes, there are also now strong indicators that melanoma is definitely much more likely the more you find it in one’s lineage, or their genetic family tree.  For example, if you have relatives, especially the closer to your bloodline, you may be several times more likely to develop melanoma skin cancer than someone who does not have skin cancer in their family at all.

This doesn’t come as a huge surprise, as the further that cancer is being researched, the more genetic links are being found to indicate it’s likelihood of occurring in people who were further down the family tree.  Breast cancer, lung cancer, even prostate cancer, are now thought to have serious links to inheritance, or genetic predisposition toward the particular cell mutations that occur when these cancers are spawned in the body.

The studies that were done on this looked at a few things.  They found that if you have a sibling with non melanoma skin cancers your risk is likely increased, and it also found something curious, that identical twins, where one twin had melanoma skin cancer, the other twin was way more likely to get some form of skin cancer, however, in fraternal twins this likelihood did not hold true.

The findings suggested that the likelihood of skin cancer could be somewhat foretold by looking at genes in a person, but not totally, because it also depended on the interaction of those genes.  The fraternal twins were at higher risk, but not nearly the ridiculously high risk that identical twins were where one had it already, so this shows that the way the genes actually behave in the body has something to do with it as well.

Leave a Reply