November 2014
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What is a “Proprietary” Formula?

Well, I watched a documentary with my boyfriend the other day, and am sad to say that one part  of it made me doubt some supplements that say their vitamins or supplements with herbs and other natural ingredients are partially a “proprietary formula”. What proprietary means is that they don’t have to disclose exactly what that formula is, so that part of the total supplement is something they do not have to display on the label, making it free game to put whatever cheap junk they want in it as fillers.

The documentary was actually all about steroids and human growth hormone (see about the GenF20 HGH alternative), which is a hotly debated topic today, not only in the world of competitive sports, but also in the average joe world where men and women alike are taking these injections to get bigger, more muscle, stamina and endurance, and more ripped physiques.  One small part of the documentary was of the film maker demonstrating how easy and cheap it was to make a supplement that was partly a “proprietary formula” with a few other types of herbs and other dried supplements added in for good measure.

He said that for little more than a buck fifty, you could make and bottle some very cheap supplements with a lot of filler (he used rice flour), and make up to fifty bucks off each bottle – quite a profit margin.  I’d like to think that there are reputable supplement makers out there who really give the customer what they deserve and what they paid for, but even for me, who takes several supplements a day, I can see how this would make a doubter out of anyone.

The supplement business is huge today, it is a multi billion dollar business, so it has a lot of entrepreneurs putting their names on pills, vitamins and supplement in hopes of making a lot of money off of something that may or may not be a subpar or watered down product.  The biggest fear is that it isn’t what it said it was, such as with the recent scandal about a male enhancement supplement that advertised as all natural actually having a prescription erectile dysfunction drug in it.

That’ the kind of thing that gives supplements a bad name and makes some people distrust what they are buying.  As for me, I simply try to make sure a supplement works, and if it doesn’t do what it says it will, I won’t ever try it again, but the ones that do work, you better bet that I’m going to be loyal to those brands!

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